IMPOSTER spelled out in blocks

Mistakes can engender self-doubt among journalists

When journalists make mistakes, the consequences can be far-reaching, affecting consumers, governments and even the economy. But responsible journalists also carry the burden of the errors, and some begin to question themselves. The “imposter syndrome” lures some journalists into a rabbit hole of self-doubt. It leaves talented reporters restraining themselves under the pressure of the …

‘Growing hostility’ between student media and administrators

Censorship of student media is pervasive across the United States, despite the lack of substantial qualitative data to confirm a recent uptick in cases, media scholars and researchers say. Interviews with student journalists, media advisers and media law researchers found that they’ve been censored or have witnessed student media censorship either as a bystander or …

Charles Lewis

Investigative journalists play a key role in bringing corruption to light

From the Pentagon to Panama, with other major discoveries in between, investigative journalism has made major contributions in bringing to light what some would rather keep in the dark. Charles Lewis has seen the highs and lows of investigative journalism throughout his career. Now a journalism professor and executive editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop, Lewis sat down with F&D’s Andreas Adriano.

What Woodward’s reporting style can teach young journalists

Coming of age as a young journalist is challenging during any time period, but it feels especially fraught in 2018. Some of the profession’s most respected names, from New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet to Washington Post Editor Marty Baron, have lamented the lack of trust in the mainstream news media and the “out …

Tear down these walls

The following essay by Charles Lewis is excerpted from a new book, “Global Teamwork: The Rise of Collaboration in Investigative Journalism,” edited by Richard Sambrook and published by the Reuters Institute at the University of Oxford. The future potential for increased collaborative research and journalism is enormous and exciting to imagine. And the dynamics driving …