Workshop co-producing series on climate change

Monday, December 3rd, 2012 

Last year, two former CBS News producers approached Workshop Executive Editor Chuck Lewis and Senior Editor Margaret Ebrahiim about joining forces to help produce a hugely ambitious documentary series about climate change. In September, Ebrahim started working as a producer on that project, which is expected to be a series titled, “Years of Living Dangerously,” set to air on the cable channel Showtime in the fall of 2013.

The executive producers and series creators are David Gelber and Joel Bach, former "60 Minutes" producers who have won a combined 11 Emmy awards. The legendary Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub ("Ocean’s 11" and "The Karate Kid"), director/producer James Cameron ("Avatar," "Titanic") and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger also will be executive producers of the series, which is intended to cover the story of climate change on three major fronts: the impact on people, here and now; the dramatic politics surrounding the issue; and the solutions being created to mitigate the problem.

Actors Matt Damon, Don Cheadle and Arnold Schwarzenegger, along with NASCAR champ Jimmie Johnson, have signed up to be correspondents for the program. The producers are in discussions with Edward Norton and a number of other celebrities as well.

The Workshop is one of several producers for the series. We are deep into the research and planning stages, with the help of Loren Stein, a veteran reporter who worked at the Center for Investigative Reporting, and who has joined our team as a researcher/reporter. And Jolie Lee, a recent graduate of the American University’s Interactive Journalism master’s program and an editor and multimedia producer for Federal News Radio, has join the month as an associate producer.

Lewis will be a producer and correspondent as well.


 

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Fighting in-house censorship

One of the occupational hazards for investigative reporters everywhere is internal censorship. So what can you do, as an individual journalist, if it appears that the great, exciting, investigative story you’ve been quietly exploring and finally have pitched is getting yawns or worse, pushback from your editor?

The future of TV news

Viewers nationwide mostly get local traffic, crime, weather and sports news, while local investigative reporting about the powers that be — and straight talk, facts and figures about the serious 21st century issues we all face  — generally have become endangered species.

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

What Pluto tells us about journalism

When NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sent back its first crisp images of Pluto last week, the culmination of a 3-billion mile, 9 1/2-year journey filled with cliffhangers and near disasters, you didn't need to be a scientist to feel the exhilaration of discovering what was, until then, a dark and blurry corner of the solar system.

Given my interests within research and media, I also thought about the lessons for journalism. 

What we're reading: award-winning journalism

One way to constantly improve as a journalist is to observe and learn from the works of others. The Society of Professional Journalists' Quill Magazine announced its top journalism picks from 2014.

Read on for summaries of some award winners.

How ISIS uses social media

The Islamic State and other terrorists groups use social-media companies to recruit, and Google, Twitter and Facebook are looking at whether and how their technology may be being exploited. Where do you draw the line between free speech and national security? A new Washington Post investigation, with contributions from Workshop summer staffer Fauzeya Rahman, explores the various viewpoints.

SRCCON Highlights

SRCCON, now in its second year, wanted to feature the hallway conversations, skillshares and collaborations that happen naturally at bigger conferences and make them the highlight of the event. We attended the Minneapolis conference to find out.

Sometimes the safest digital footprint is the simplest

For journalists, much of what we do on a daily basis involves classified information. In today's digital landscape, it may require extra knowledge to keep that information secure. A recent National Press Club training shared key things journalists can do to keep themselves, and sources, safe.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.