Workshop co-producing series on climate change

Monday, December 3rd, 2012 

Last year, two former CBS News producers approached Workshop Executive Editor Chuck Lewis and Senior Editor Margaret Ebrahiim about joining forces to help produce a hugely ambitious documentary series about climate change. In September, Ebrahim started working as a producer on that project, which is expected to be a series titled, “Years of Living Dangerously,” set to air on the cable channel Showtime in the fall of 2013.

The executive producers and series creators are David Gelber and Joel Bach, former "60 Minutes" producers who have won a combined 11 Emmy awards. The legendary Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub ("Ocean’s 11" and "The Karate Kid"), director/producer James Cameron ("Avatar," "Titanic") and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger also will be executive producers of the series, which is intended to cover the story of climate change on three major fronts: the impact on people, here and now; the dramatic politics surrounding the issue; and the solutions being created to mitigate the problem.

Actors Matt Damon, Don Cheadle and Arnold Schwarzenegger, along with NASCAR champ Jimmie Johnson, have signed up to be correspondents for the program. The producers are in discussions with Edward Norton and a number of other celebrities as well.

The Workshop is one of several producers for the series. We are deep into the research and planning stages, with the help of Loren Stein, a veteran reporter who worked at the Center for Investigative Reporting, and who has joined our team as a researcher/reporter. And Jolie Lee, a recent graduate of the American University’s Interactive Journalism master’s program and an editor and multimedia producer for Federal News Radio, has join the month as an associate producer.

Lewis will be a producer and correspondent as well.


 

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