Funding our work

Thursday, November 17th, 2016 

Dear friends:

The work we’ve published in 2016 would not have been possible without two significant groups: our interns and our donors.  

Our interns — graduate students from American University and other schools around the country — research and report through our partnerships with The Washington Post, FRONTLINE and other major media. We are proud to count Workshop alums among the staff at the Post, NBC News, Politico, McClatchy, the Huffington Post, the Houston Chronicle, WNYC, Colorado Public Radio and Mother Jones, among many others.

Our funding — independent of the university, which provides office space and tech support —  comes from donors large and small. In 2016, that funding allowed us to examine fatal shootings by police and unwarranted evictions with the Post; ongoing housing problems more than three years after Hurricane Sandy with FRONTLINE; the difficulty victims face in prosecuting childhood sexual abuse as adults with Reveal News. We studied the growth of the many courageous nonprofit newsrooms overseas; analyzed eight years’ worth of banking data to get a clearer picture of the toll the recession took on every state; and relayed how Cuban media may finally be opening up to average citizens.

Thank you for helping to make these investigations a reality.  

Please consider making your donation this year on or by Nov. 29 — which is Giving Tuesday nationwide — to ensure that our stories in 2017 will be as impactful as they have been in the past; this year, a story we wrote led to a change in a law in Washington.

If you haven’t donated before, a contribution of any amount demonstrates your belief in independent journalism. And if you’re a continuing donor, please consider a recurring donation of $5 or $10 a month.

Your donations will allow us to continue this work and to train the next generation of great investigative reporters.

Thank you for your support,

Lynne Perri, Managing Editor

p.s.  All donations to the Investigative Reporting Workshop are tax-deductible.


Recent News

Amid rush to deploy driverless cars, federal regulators urged to keep hands on the wheel

The era of driverless vehicles appears to be rapidly approaching, raising a bevy of urgent questions about how to prevent the emergence of new hazards on the nation’s roads.

So how much preparation have federal transportation authorities carried out to meet the challenge of the advent of self-driving cars and trucks? Not nearly enough, according to a new 44-page report by the Government Accountability Office, a Congressional watchdog agency.

After a long hold out, tobacco companies to issue mea culpas

In a matter of days, the American tobacco industry will begin publicly admitting some ugly truths about its dark history and the health effects of smoking.

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

How drones are changing disaster coverage

Drones, small unmanned aircraft, have changed how some news organizations cover disasters. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria represent a “defining moment for the use of unmanned aerial systems in news gathering,” Greg Agvent, the senior director of National News Technology and CNN AIR, said. 


Offenses in youth centers send teens to adult prisons

A ProPublica reporter wondered why a Southwest Illinois juvenile facility was sending teenage inmates to adult prisons. Here's the story behind the story.


Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Explore The Workshop's 2017 holiday gift guide

This year's holiday gift-giving guide will impress those journalists in your life who love swag (and irony).

Science march film will turn on scientists turned political candidates, leaders

A new documentary will tell stories about scientists who want to counter the Trump administration’s “war on science." Director Larry Kirkman, who teaches at the AU School of Communication, shares his vision for the film, along with his "work-in-progress" video featuring footage from the March for Science on April 22.

A shortlist of fall media

The autumn news cycle boiled over like some Northwestern river amid a peak salmon run. Here are exceptional examples of storytelling I’ve spent time with in the last few weeks. They pinball and rebound between the most salient topics in media of the moment: extreme wealth, the White House and race.

FRONTLINE, IRW launch new fellowship

The PBS series FRONTLINE and the Investigative Reporting Workshop (IRW) at American University’s School of Communication announce a new journalism fellowship.

Barriers still keep disabled voters from polls

Nearly 28 years since the passing of the American’s with Disabilities Act, some polling places and voting systems still are not accessible.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.