Privacy statement

The Investigative Reporting Workshop is committed to maintaining the maximum amount of personal privacy for its Web users. At this time, the Workshop does not collect information from our users that would permit us to identify them personally. However, we may collect such information as Internet domain name, time of visit, length of visit, pages visited and the amount of information downloaded. Our tracking information does not include cookies.

In the future, it is possible this policy will change to permit us to maintain lists of users and communicate with them. When it does, the following principles will apply:

  • We will continue to collect statistical information pertaining to use of the site.
  • We will only collect information necessary to facilitate communication between users and the managers of the site. This may include such things as the address of the Internet site you use to access the site, your name, name of your organization, your e-mail address and telephone number(s). Except for material needed to help track site traffic, no information will be collected or maintained without telling you at the time it is being collected.
  • None of this information will be shared with third parties.
  • You will only receive communications from us that you request.
  • You may ask at any time to be removed from our lists and databases.

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Latest from iLab

'Future of Truth'

'Future of Truth'

Charles Lewis, founding executive editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop, wrote “935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity,” which will be published June 24, 2014, by Public Affairs. The Workshop also will run a special series related to the book.

Navigating FOIA in DC

Access to government documents and data is essential to local investigative “street” reporting and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is the most important tool to get them, say journalists in the D.C. community. 

 

Most Recent Posts

'Measuring impact' wins SPJ award

Measuring Impact: The art, science and mystery of nonprofit news assessment,” has won a 2013 Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists in the "Research about Journalism"  category. 

'Years' project airs in April

 “Years of Living Dangerously,” a nine-part documentary on climate change created by executive producers James Cameron and Jerry Weintraub, has begun its run on Showtime. Senior Producer Margaret Ebrahim and Associate Producer Jolie Lee worked for more than a year to research, report and produce two stories for the series. 

Sunshine Week events in Washington

Here's the rundown on several panels, workshops and other events about using and understanding the latest developments in freedom of information resources taking place in Washington this week. 

How to find stories on fraud

A free workshop hosted by the Reynolds Center for Business Reporting offered plenty of tips for how reporters can better develop enterprise stories about corporate fraud.

Learning how to make the most of our data at NICAR

At this year's annual NICAR conference, journalists from the Workshop are learning and refining new ways to augment our investigations with computer-assisted reporting. 

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.