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The Investigative Reporting Workshop is committed to maintaining the maximum amount of personal privacy for its Web users. At this time, the Workshop does not collect information from our users that would permit us to identify them personally. However, we may collect such information as Internet domain name, time of visit, length of visit, pages visited and the amount of information downloaded. Our tracking information does not include cookies.

In the future, it is possible this policy will change to permit us to maintain lists of users and communicate with them. When it does, the following principles will apply:

  • We will continue to collect statistical information pertaining to use of the site.
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Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Collaboration: the key

Collaboration was key for the teams of international journalists who produced The Panama Papers, a report that showcases how reporters can hold people and institutions accountable across borders. 

The Buying of the President

Every four years, the American people endure by far the longest and most expensive election of any nation in the world — until the next one. Who profits the most?

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Madden wins Schorr prize

Patrick Madden of NPR member station WAMU 88.5 is the winner of the annual Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, named for the respected NPR senior news analyst and veteran Washington journalist who died in 2010. His winning entry was "Assault on Justice," a collaboration with the Workshop and Reveal News.

MacArthur Foundation awards Workshop

The Investigative Reporting Workshop will receive $1.5 million in general operating support over the next five years from the MacArthur Foundation, which today announced its renewed and expanded commitment to journalism and media.

The Workshop is one of 12 news organizations across the country to receive these unrestricted grants. 

Superstorm Sandy victims still struggling

A new FRONTLINE/NPR investigation, "Business of Disaster," examines why thousands of residents of New Jersey and New York are still struggling three years after Superstorm Sandy devastated their communities. See the trailer here.

What we're reading: Homicide coverage

Great journalism continues to be produced by reporters immersing themselves in the lives of others, particularly on the issue of homicide. At the recent Logan Symposium, Jill Leovy talked about the making of her new book, "Ghettoside," and Doug Pardue gave his audience the backstory of "Till Death Do Us Part."

The power of images can make stories more memorable

At the recent Society for News Design conference, designers, illustrators and photographers showed what it takes to make stories visually appealing. El Mundo's art director displayed the creative efforts, from his sketches to finished magazine covers, that the staff undertakes to explain and showcase their journalism.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.