Jacob Fenton

Jacob Fenton

Director of Computer-Assisted Reporting
fenton@american.edu

Jacob Fenton is a 2015-16 Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University. Formerly he worked as Editorial Engineer at The Sunlight Foundation. During 2010 and 2011 Fenton was Director of Computer-Assisted Reporting at the Workshop, where he analyzed data for investigations; maintained the servers and backend code that power Banktracker and the rest of the site; and built web applications, databases and interactive maps and graphics.

Projects built by Jacob Fenton

Projects maintained by Jacob Fenton

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Asian journalists wrestle with new rules

Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea news organizations face new challenges online as their governments now include internet activity in their regulatory structures. What used to be a niche for independent media has instead become a new battleground for freedom of expression. 

Seven signs Cuban media is moving toward openness

While it’s too soon to tell if a true sea change is in the works, here are seven relatively recent shifts in the Cuban mediasphere. Many of them would have seemed inconceivable just a few years ago and bear watching in the future.

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

BankTracker updates

Our BankTracker report has been updated with the latest figures from the FDIC to reflect earnings and assets through June 2016. Earlier in the year, we published an in-depth analysis of the state of banks between 2008 and 2015, finding that more than 2,300 banks became inactive then because of mergers, corporate reorganizations, self-liquidations and failures — more than 500 banks failed — and that every state lost at least one bank during that eight-year stretch.

 

 

Islamophobia in focus: Panel confronts American media bias against Islam

Journalists and scholars of Islam explored the bias Muslims face and how the media influences both public opinion and global politics. 


New Trump biography reveals a complex picture

Washington Post staffers talk about "Trump Revealed," the new book by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher that draws on a team of reporters and fact-checkers who looked into the presidential candidate's life and his worldwide travels, his hotel-rebuilding successes and his investment failures in Atlantic City casinos. The Post also makes hundreds of documents available for readers to see for themselves how they reported the story.

What we're reading: In-depth stories covering a wide range of topics

In this investigation the Food & Environment Reporting Network looks into how oil palm plantations have not only threatened rainforests in Indonesia and Malaysia but also opened doors to poachers. The story is one of several a young reporter has been following in his immersive year into investigative reporting.

Charge of assaulting an officer narrows in DC

Last fall, formal legislation was introduced by the D.C. Council to narrow the definition of what constituted an assault on a police officer. The council committee that crafted the language in the bill cited "Assault on Justice," an investigation by WAMU-FM, the Investigative Reporting Workshop and Reveal of the Center for Investigative Reporting, for prompting the reform.

In March 2016, the bill finally became law. A look at how the change unfolded.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.