Agnel Philip

News21 Reporter

Agnel (Arizona State University) is on the overview team. Bad at cooking, decent at tennis, better at math and kind of OK at guitar. Following the numbers.

Stories written by Agnel Philip

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

How to cover hate

Even as hate crimes occur with more frequency, newsrooms for the most part tend to treat them as individual problems, not as systemic problems that require better follow-through and focus. 

Truth and lies in the Trump era

Trump’s presidency, and the way it is being reported in the media and perceived by the public, has led me to ask some basic questions — about my profession of journalism; the relative power of truth and lies; and the future of democratic self-government in these United States. Does truth even matter in covering this president? Are he and his proclivity for telling falsehoods the problem, or is he a symptom of a deeper affliction in our political-economic system?

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

A shortlist of fall media

The autumn news cycle boiled over like some Northwestern river amid a peak salmon run. Here are exceptional examples of storytelling I’ve spent time with in the last few weeks. They pinball and rebound between the most salient topics in media of the moment: extreme wealth, the White House and race.

FRONTLINE, IRW launch new fellowship

The PBS series FRONTLINE and the Investigative Reporting Workshop (IRW) at American University’s School of Communication announce a new journalism fellowship.

Barriers still keep disabled voters from polls

Nearly 28 years since the passing of the American’s with Disabilities Act, some polling places and voting systems still are not accessible.

New site keeps journalists' stories alive

On March 2, 2017, Cecilio Pineda, a Mexican investigative reporter, posted a video about the close tie between a drug cartel leader and a local politician on his Facebook account. Two hours later, he was murdered. Pineda’s investigation, along with ones of two other fallen journalists on drug cartels in Mexico, has been translated into nine languages by Forbidden Stories, a newly launched website, so their work can reach as many people as possible. 

Artists from oppressive regimes caution Western political complacency

Most of the West enjoys freedom of expression and media, but artists from oppressive countries warned an American audience not to take their freedom for granted at an event at the National Press Club recently. Dissidents from Russia, Syria, Iran and other countries said their fight for freedom of expression is inextricably linked to the freedom of others around the world.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.