Yoichiro Tateiwa

Yoichiro Tateiwa

Journalist-in-Residence

Yoichiro Tateiwa has been a reporter for the Japanese public television network, NHK, since 1991. He came to the Investigative Reporting Workshop in the summer of 2010 to spend a year studying American nonprofit investigative journalism initiatives.

Early in is career he was based in the NHK Okinawa bureau, covering the police and the U.S. forces in Okinawa. In 1995, he was part of NHK's team covering the Hanshin earthquake.

In 1996, he became a foreign correspondent for NHK. He became Teheran bureau chief in 1997, but the Iranian government expelled him in 1998 for reporting stories critical of the government. He later spent a year in Iraq covering the war and related developments.

Since 2006 he has been a chief correspondent in the investigative unit of NHK's Osaka bureau.

Stories written by Yoichiro Tateiwa

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

'Future of Truth'

'Future of Truth'

Charles Lewis, founding executive editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop, wrote “935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America's Moral Integrity,” now in bookstores and available online. The Workshop has published a special series related to the book, and NBC's Chuck Todd recently interviewed Lewis about the public's disenchantment with Congress, the courts and the media.

Navigating FOIA in DC

Access to government documents and data is essential to local investigative “street” reporting and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is the most important tool to get them, say journalists in the D.C. community. 

 

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Festival showcases power of documentary reporting

The selection of films at the 2014 AFI Docs Festival along with new documentary techniques allow for a greater exchange about little-known subjects between filmmakers and audiences. 

New book launches

Executive Editor Charles Lewis celebrated the release of his new book, "935 Lies," at the National Press Club last week, an event hosted by the Center for Public Integrity, which Lewis founded 25 years ago. It was the first of several programs and interviews related to "935 Lies."


Mentoring the next generation

Our partnership with The Washington Post continues this summer under an ever-expanding model, as we pair our Workshop interns with several different investigative teams at the Post.

Banktracker Updates

After more than five years, the Investigative Reporting Workshop has decided to make some changes in its Banktracker feature.

CNN anchor reflects on censorship, challenges

Retired CNN anchor Bernard Shaw recalled his reporting on the Tiananmen Square massacre in an address to about 120 guests at the Newseum on Saturday in Washington, focusing on challenges today to journalism and exhorting his audience to become engaged and informed citizens.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.