Kat Aaron

Kat Aaron

Writer
Phone: (202) 885-6353
kaaron@investigativereportingworkshop.org

Kat Aaron is a 2012 Alicia Patterson Fellow, a reporter at the Investigative Reporting Workshop and the project editor for the Workshop's What Went Wrong series. She writes about people, poverty and the justice system. 

In her work with the Patterson Foundation, she wrote about the growing crush of self-represented litigants in the civil courts, and what it means for poor people and the courts when most people don't have lawyers. Aaron's work on the subject began with two major stories about the civil courts for the Workshop and Mother Jones. For the What Went Wrong project, she wrote extensively about foreclosure, often in partnership with New America Media; about the Great Depression; and about poverty in America.   

Before joining the Workshop, she was a staff writer at the Center for Public Integrity, where she did investigative reporting on financial and economic issues. Until July 2008, she was the co-director of People’s Production House, a nonprofit journalism and media policy organization headquartered in New York City. From 2005 to 2008, she was a producer for Wakeup Call, the morning news show at WBAI 99.5 FM in New York, and was a contributor to Free Speech Radio News, Pacifica Radio’s national evening news program. 

Aaron has a bachelor's degree in Economic History from Barnard College, and a master's in Journalism and Public Affairs from American Unversity's School of Communication.

Aaron tweets about the civil courts, economics, journalism and occasionally food at @kataaron

Project Editor Kat Aaron gives a brief introduction to the What Went Wrong: The Betrayal of the American Dream project.

Stories written by Kat Aaron

Recent News

Critics say underride fix will do little to curb deadly hazard

Truck underride crashes are among the most horrific collisions on the road. The gruesome tragedies typically involve a car sliding under the back or side of a tractor-trailer. Will new proposals by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration make any difference? The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, which has conducted crash tests and other research on the issue, said the latest plan “misses an opportunity to substantially improve” underride protection.

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Collaboration: the key

Collaboration was key for the teams of international journalists who produced The Panama Papers, a report that showcases how reporters can hold people and institutions accountable across borders. 

The Buying of the President

Every four years, the American people endure by far the longest and most expensive election of any nation in the world — until the next one. Who profits the most?

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

IRE's conference lives on through tipsheets

Even if you were not able to attend the annual Investigative Reporters and Editors conference earlier this month in New Orleans, the speakers and panelists create invaluable tipsheets you can still access.

Whatever you do, keep moving forward

As Michelle Obama prepares to visit Africa to promote girls' education, two African women contemplate their future as investigative journalists and as educators who can improve college courses and create internships. 

Seeking to escape metrics' tyranny, an editor asks, 'Why?'

In our brave new big data world, web metrics, the statistics that measure page views, unique visitors, bounce rates, engagement time, tweets, Facebook “Likes,” and a host of other things, have become proxies for an organization’s effectiveness.

SPJ honors Lewis with Distinguished Service Award

The Society of Professional Journalists (Washington, D.C., chapter) honored Executive Editor Charles Lewis with the 2016 Distinguished Public Service Award, presented Tuesday night at the National Press Club in Washington.

Survey shows extent of reporting worldwide

A new package of stories, maps and graphics showcases our survey of reporting organizations overseas. In addition, Executive Editor Charles Lewis reflects on his years of traveling and advising startups in other countries.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.