Kat Aaron

Kat Aaron

Writer
Phone: (202) 885-6353
kaaron@investigativereportingworkshop.org

Kat Aaron is a 2012 Alicia Patterson Fellow, a reporter at the Investigative Reporting Workshop and the project editor for the Workshop's What Went Wrong series. She writes about people, poverty and the justice system. 

In her work with the Patterson Foundation, she wrote about the growing crush of self-represented litigants in the civil courts, and what it means for poor people and the courts when most people don't have lawyers. Aaron's work on the subject began with two major stories about the civil courts for the Workshop and Mother Jones. For the What Went Wrong project, she wrote extensively about foreclosure, often in partnership with New America Media; about the Great Depression; and about poverty in America.   

Before joining the Workshop, she was a staff writer at the Center for Public Integrity, where she did investigative reporting on financial and economic issues. Until July 2008, she was the co-director of People’s Production House, a nonprofit journalism and media policy organization headquartered in New York City. From 2005 to 2008, she was a producer for Wakeup Call, the morning news show at WBAI 99.5 FM in New York, and was a contributor to Free Speech Radio News, Pacifica Radio’s national evening news program. 

Aaron has a bachelor's degree in Economic History from Barnard College, and a master's in Journalism and Public Affairs from American Unversity's School of Communication.

Aaron tweets about the civil courts, economics, journalism and occasionally food at @kataaron

Project Editor Kat Aaron gives a brief introduction to the What Went Wrong: The Betrayal of the American Dream project.

Stories written by Kat Aaron

Recent News

Brain boosters a gold mine for supplements industry but benefits are hotly disputed

The Government Accountability Office is investigating the marketing of brain and memory supplements and the problems regulators face in reining in misleading claims. The GAO examination was requested by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., formerly the ranking minority member on the U.S. Senate Committee on Aging. She has called out retailers for deceptive promotions of memory and brain supplements, and sees regulatory oversight of the supplement industry as “alarmingly inadequate.”

Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Asian journalists wrestle with new rules

Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea news organizations face new challenges online as their governments now include internet activity in their regulatory structures. What used to be a niche for independent media has instead become a new battleground for freedom of expression. 

Seven signs Cuban media is moving toward openness

While it’s too soon to tell if a true sea change is in the works, here are seven relatively recent shifts in the Cuban mediasphere. Many of them would have seemed inconceivable just a few years ago and bear watching in the future.

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Summer 2017 interns

We're looking for talented student journalists to join our team in the summer of 2017.  Positions include researchers/reporters, data journalists and video editors. Application deadline is Feb. 15.

Russia's disinformation strategy

Louise Lief, our scholar in residence, writes about Russia's manipulation of news and information, not only in the recent U.S. elections but also in other countries as well. 

Remembrances

Charles Lewis and Gordon Witkin reflect on the lives and careers of Phillip Knightley and David Donald, two renowned investigative journalists who died earlier this month. Knightley was well-known for his work on holding drug manufacturers accountable for the widespread use of the drug thalidomide, which caused birth defects across Europe. Donald was one of the pioneers and leaders of modern, computer-assisted data journalism. You can see their tributes here on the ICIJ website.

Remembering David Donald

David Donald died Dec. 10, 2016 after a yearlong battle with cancer. In January, the Workshop will host an event to remember his life and work, and IRE will honor him by creating a fund in his name to further data journalism.

Charles Lewis travels to Oxford

Executive Editor Charles Lewis will travel to a conference at Oxford University's Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism to talk about the future of investigative journalism and collaboration. 

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.