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Latest from iLab

Asian journalists wrestle with new rules

Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea news organizations face new challenges online as their governments now include internet activity in their regulatory structures. What used to be a niche for independent media has instead become a new battleground for freedom of expression. 

Seven signs Cuban media is moving toward openness

While it’s too soon to tell if a true sea change is in the works, here are seven relatively recent shifts in the Cuban mediasphere. Many of them would have seemed inconceivable just a few years ago and bear watching in the future.


Most Recent Posts

Gavin MacFadyen: A remembrance

American-born investigative journalist Gavin MacFadyen created and began directing the Centre for Investigative Journalism in London in 2003, and he was also a visiting professor at City University of London. He worked on more than 50 investigative television programs and helped to train journalists from around the world at his annual conferences. His firm support for data journalism had a major impact on its growth and success in the United Kingdom. He investigated and reported on stories about child labor; environmental pollution, the torture of political prisoners, neo-Nazis in Britain, Contra murders in Nicaragua, UK industrial accidents; Chinese organized crime; the CIA’s history; maritime piracy; election fraud in South America; diamond mines in South Africa; and Frank Sinatra’s connections with organized crime. 

Chuck Lewis attends the Integrity20 conference in Australia

Terrorism, corruption and the future of democracy — those are some of the topics that will be addressed at the Integrity20 conference in Brisbane, Australia, from Oct. 24-26. The conference aims to assemble “20 of the world’s most unique, courageous and provocative minds” to discuss some of the most important problems the world faces. One of the speakers will be Charles Lewis, the founding executive editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop.

Newseum celebrates Cronkite's legacy

Top journalists came together in Washington to remember the life and impact of news anchor Walter Cronkite, a journalist once known as “the most trusted man in America.” 

Can the next president rewrite the First Amendment?

The 2016 presidential election’s effect on free speech comes with a good-news-bad-news message: The Supreme Court is likely to continue protecting free speech for reporters and the public, but “secrecy creep” will probably worsen in executive agencies and the White House.

Lessons on media law

The Media Law Resource Center covered what journalists and journalism students need to know to be prepared to work in media, including copyright, censorship to recording laws, at a recent session at the National Press Club. The center is hosting a similar session at Boston University Oct. 17.


Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with, now, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.


Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.