Posts tagged 'Pew Internet Project'

News becomes more social

Posted: June 28, 2010 | Tags: journalism-ecosystem, MOB Conference, Pew Internet Project

Since 2000, news has become "pervasive, portable, personalized, participarty — and a social experience."

This was among the findings by the Pew Internet Project's latest study on "How Media Consumption Has Changed Since 2000."

Project Director Lee Rainie spoke at the "Monetizing Online Business" conference last week in New York.

The study found that 62 percent of Americans use the Internet on an average day, while 56 percent say they go online to have fun or kill time.

The number of people going online to find their news (61 percent) is catching up to the number of people who turn ...

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CIA whistleblower files health complaint in prison

The biggest surprise of the Barack Obama presidency to me and to many others has been what I have called “the unexpected national security obsessiveness” of his administration. Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice has repeatedly used the draconian 1917 Espionage Act to prosecute journalists’ sources, effectively criminalizing investigative journalism. Or as James Goodale, The New York Times’ lead lawyer during the seminal Pentagon Papers case put it in his recent memoir, “Obama has used the Espionage Act to indict more leakers than any president in the history of this country.” No president’s administration in the past century — indeed, all of them combined — has prosecuted more whistleblowing sources using the Espionage Act than the Obama administration.

 

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An inside look at Fatal Force series

Our recently published “Fatal Force: Two years after Ferguson, police shootings up,” a project with The Washington Post, is an extension of the Post’s Pulitzer Prize-winning series illuminating officer-involved shootings in the United States during 2015, as well as the first follow-up piece the Post published in 2016 that sought to find out how police departments handle releasing the names of officers who use fatal force.


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