Shop Notes

Sharing data and ideas

Posted: March 3, 2017 | Tags: IRE

Jacksonville, Florida, was the host city for this year’s Computer-Assisted Reporting conference, one of two annual conferences run by the Investigative Reporters and Editors. The March 2-5 program included practical tips, story ideas and computer training. Tipsheets and links are online, too.

Chuck Lewis, Workshop founding executive editor, moderated “Doing data journalism under duress” on March 3, which covered collaboration across borders and ways to make data more globally accessible. 

The three speakers on the panel brought unique experiences and skills: Anatoliy Bondarenko, head of data apps team at Texty.org.ua; Rigoberto Carvajal, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists’ data expert; and Eva Constantaras, a data journalist specializing in building data journalism teams in developing countries. The Workshop's Josh Benson and Alex Cohen also attended the conference.

The conference organizers held a tribute to former IRE training director and Philip Meyer Award winner David Donald, who died in December. Donald was the former data editor at the Investigative Reporting Workshop and data journalist in residence on the faculty of the School of Communication at American University.




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