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Summer 2017 interns

Posted: Jan. 19, 2017 | Tags: interns

The Investigative Reporting Workshop, a nonprofit news organization based at the American University School of Communication in Washington, is looking for smart, engaged students from around the country for internships in the summer of 2017.

Positions include researchers, data journalists, videographers, graphic designers and web producers. Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. Preferred majors include journalism, communication, film, public policy, public health, history or economics.

The Workshop publishes in-depth stories about government and corporate accountability, on topics ranging widely from the environment and health to national security and the economy. The Workshop pairs experienced professional reporters and editors with students and co-publishes with mainstream media partners as well as other nonprofit news sites. 

Those partners include PBS FRONTLINE and The Washington Post.

The stipend for all positions is $17 an hour for 30 hours a week. Positions will run from 7 to 10 weeks, with start dates as early as May 15, depending on the end date of an individual student's spring semester. All Workshop internships end Aug. 1. Housing and transportation are not provided, although AU dorms are open to applicants from other schools.

The application deadline is Feb. 15, 2017. Please email Managing Editor Lynne Perri a cover letter and resume at irwinterns17@gmail.com. If you're specifically interested in the new David Donald Fellowship for Data Journalists, please specify that in your cover letter. 




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