Shop Notes

'Business of Disaster' finalist in IRE awards

Posted: April 14, 2017 | Tags: journalism

“House_Sandy”

FRONTLINE photo

"Business of Disaster" looked at houses in New Jersey and New York that were damaged during Superstorm Sandy.

 

Business of Disaster,” the PBS FRONTLINE program about ongoing housing problems more than three years after the devastation caused by Superstorm Sandy, was a finalist in the IRE awards this year in the large broadcat/video category and also in the large radio/audio category. 

Congratulations to Rick Young, Emma Schwartz and Fritz Kramer — the FRONTLINE team based here at the Workshop and the School of Communication — and to Laura Sullivan of NPR, who was the correspondent on the program. 

“Business of Disaster” was the Workshop’s ninth co-production with the team. Four student journalists, D. Ashley Campbell, Daniel Farber Ball, Taylor Harris and Anthony Brunner, worked as researchers, reporters and production assistants, and Campbell wrote two sidebars and created a timeline

The one-hour program examined why thousands of residents of New Jersey and New York are still struggling years after the storm, and the promise that their houses would be rebuilt. The investigation included a deep dive into the nation’s disaster recovery system, revealing major problems with the flood insurance program and efforts to build more resilient communities.




Recent Posts

Images of black women skew negative, study finds

Only 13 percent of black and white millennial women think African-American women are portrayed positively in the media. That’s just one statistic from a new study on depictions of African-American women in advertising, news, reality TV and other media.

Few seek media coverage of science news

Many people don't seek out science news and some are wary of what they do read. The Pew Research Center's new study found that people also see problems in the news media being too quick to report findings that may not hold up. And some readers and viewers find themselves overwhelmed by how many studies are published, making it hard to distinguish between high- and low-quality reports. 

What we're reading: Books and more

What we're reading this month: deeply reported books, six-chapter investigations and more.


 Subscribe to the RSS Feed

Archives

Twitter

Follow the workshop at IRWorkshop