Shop Notes

Summer internship deadline nears

Posted: Feb. 15, 2013 | Tags: Workshop news

The Investigative Reporting Workshop, a professional news organization in the School of Communication at American University, is looking for smart, engaged students from around the country for summer internships.

Positions include researchers, videographers, graphic designers and web producers. Undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to apply. Preferred majors include journalism, communication, film, public policy, public health, history or economics.

The Workshop publishes in-depth stories about government and corporate accountability, ranging widely from the environment and health to national security and the economy. The Workshop pairs experienced professional reporters and editors with students and co-publishes with mainstream media partners as well as other nonprofit news sites. We also have an ongoing relationship with the PBS program FRONTLINE.

The salary for all positions will be $15 an hour for 30 hours a week. Positions will run from 7 to 10 weeks, with start dates as early as May 15 or as late as June 15, depending on when an individual student's spring semester ends. All Workshop internships will end by Aug. 1. Housing and transportation are not provided, although AU dorms are open to applicants from other schools.

The application deadline has been extended to Feb. 18, 2013. 

Send a resume and cover letter to Jose Ramos, administrative coordinator, at jr7394a@student.american.edu.

 




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