Shop Notes

New programs, new ideas

Posted: Feb. 6, 2013 | Tags: Manufacturing, Sunlight Foundation, What Went Wrong

Reporter Michael Lawson, who continues to cover the economy for us as part of our “What Went Wrong” series, looks at the influence of innovative college engineering programs, and their potential impact on the growth of manufacturing in the country. 

Lawson also branched out of his comfort zone last weekend when he participated in a “data fest” at Columbia University. Journalists, computer programmers and math wizards worked in teams to see if they could find, compile, analyze and then make more easily accessible databases related to government and campaign finances. Michael wrote about the challenges and the thrill of this ongoing use of data to develop new stories. 




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