Archives for September, 2012

Immigration advocates call for limits on solitary confinement

Posted: Sept. 25, 2012 | Tags: immigration

A group of doctors and immigrant advocates have called for federal officials to stop what they consider widespread abuse of solitary confinement for immigrants in detention.

The Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center and Physicians for Human Rights condemned the practice in a report released Tuesday. It accuses guards of repeatedly placing immigrants in isolation cells, without access to lawyers or medical evaluation, for arbitrary reasons. Detention centers often separate gay and transgender immigrants, as well as detainees with mental health problems, for weeks and months at a time, according to the report.

“The government cannot continue to detain ...

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Poverty rates unchanged

Posted: Sept. 12, 2012 | Tags: What Went Wrong

Michael Lawson, who covers the economy and jobs as part of the team on our What Went Wrong project, writes today about the Census Bureau's annual report on income, poverty and health insurance. Two of the headlines — that income is down and inequality is up — will come as no surprise. But the details are more nuanced and include the point that the poverty rate is flat. 

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Economic slump still affects food access, nutrition

Posted: Sept. 6, 2012 | Tags: What Went Wrong

As partisans rally behind their visions for the country at political conventions, the view of many Americans still remains bleak. Over the last two years, our What Went Wrong project has tracked the impact of the Great Recession and the Washington and Wall Street policies contributing to it. And now, despite improving economic conditions, a new report shows a record number of Americans are still feeding their families with government help. Nearly 47 million Americans, 15 percent of the population, used food stamps in June. The number of participants in the program, officially the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), has ...

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Recent Posts

Editors: 'We are not at war with Trump'

Top editors of two of the country’s leading news organizations said that their reporters were at the forefront of covering the Trump administration, but they were not competing with each other to topple the presidency.

Dean Baquet and Marty Baron, executive editors of The New York Times and The Washington Post, respectively, said that a journalist’s mission of pursuing truth and fairness hasn’t changed in the Trump era.

Behind the Post's opioids investigation

Graduate student and Workshop intern Reis Thebault was a contributing reporter to a recent Washington Post investigation into congressional action that many in the Drug Enforcement Agency saw as hampering their efforts to stem the opioid crisis.

King hoped to enlighten Kennedy on civil rights

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. tried to influence John F. Kennedy in his run for president because he saw Kennedy as far removed from the realities of blacks in America, according to a new book on the relationship between the two powerful men. 


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