Shop Notes

'Lost' wins immigration award

Posted: Nov. 8, 2012 | Tags: immigration

The Investigative Reporting Workshop and FRONTLINE received the Immigration Journalism Award from the French-American Foundation on Nov. 7 in New York City for the documentary, "Lost in Detention," which aired Oct. 18, 2011. Senior Editor Margaret Ebrahim, who was a co-producer on the project, accepted the award along with the film's correspondent, Maria Hinojosa, on behalf of their colleagues, co-producer, director and writer Rick Young; co-producer Catherine Rentz; associate producer Frederick Kramer; editor Leslie Atkins; and director of photography Travis Fox.

The film examined President Obama's controversial immigration enforcement policies, through which more than 400,000 undocumented immigrants were deported in 2011, and also found more than 170 complaints of sexual abuse of detainees over the last four years.

Presenters at the annual black-tie dinner and fundraiser for the foundation included former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger; former New York Times Editor Bill Keller; and CBS News correspondent Bob Simon.

 




Recent Posts

What Pluto tells us about journalism

When NASA's New Horizons spacecraft sent back its first crisp images of Pluto last week, the culmination of a 3-billion mile, 9 1/2-year journey filled with cliffhangers and near disasters, you didn't need to be a scientist to feel the exhilaration of discovering what was, until then, a dark and blurry corner of the solar system.

Given my interests within research and media, I also thought about the lessons for journalism. 

What we're reading: award-winning journalism

One way to constantly improve as a journalist is to observe and learn from the works of others. The Society of Professional Journalists' Quill Magazine announced its top journalism picks from 2014.

Read on for summaries of some award winners.

How ISIS uses social media

The Islamic State and other terrorists groups use social-media companies to recruit, and Google, Twitter and Facebook are looking at whether and how their technology may be being exploited. Where do you draw the line between free speech and national security? A new Washington Post investigation, with contributions from Workshop summer staffer Fauzeya Rahman, explores the various viewpoints.


 Subscribe to the RSS Feed

Archives

Twitter

Follow the workshop at IRWorkshop