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'Lost' wins immigration award

Posted: Nov. 8, 2012 | Tags: immigration

The Investigative Reporting Workshop and FRONTLINE received the Immigration Journalism Award from the French-American Foundation on Nov. 7 in New York City for the documentary, "Lost in Detention," which aired Oct. 18, 2011. Senior Editor Margaret Ebrahim, who was a co-producer on the project, accepted the award along with the film's correspondent, Maria Hinojosa, on behalf of their colleagues, co-producer, director and writer Rick Young; co-producer Catherine Rentz; associate producer Frederick Kramer; editor Leslie Atkins; and director of photography Travis Fox.

The film examined President Obama's controversial immigration enforcement policies, through which more than 400,000 undocumented immigrants were deported in 2011, and also found more than 170 complaints of sexual abuse of detainees over the last four years.

Presenters at the annual black-tie dinner and fundraiser for the foundation included former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger; former New York Times Editor Bill Keller; and CBS News correspondent Bob Simon.

 




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