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New rules to help immigrants

Posted: Dec. 10, 2012 | Tags: immigration

 

Last year, the Investigative Reporting Workshop highlighted the issue of sexual abuse in immigration detention in our PBS Frontline documentary "Lost in Detention."  After the broadcast, more than 30 members of Congress cited our investigation when it asked the Government Accountability Office to look into sexual abuse in immigrant detention centers. Last week, DHS announced new rules that would help protect immigrants from sexual abuse. These regulations mark a significant departure from DHS's Performance Based National Detention Standards, which do not have the force of law. These new rules will provide more resources to prevent sexual abuse and better investigate and prosecute crimes. 

 




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