Archives for June, 2011

Live Chat with Barlett & Steele

Posted: June 21, 2011 | Tags: What Went Wrong

Cover of Philadelphia Inquirer, 1991 seriesDon Barlett and Jim Steele held a live chat Monday, June 20, 2011 on Philly.com, the website of the Philadelphia Inquirer, read the full transcript here. They fielded questions on the trade deficit, and why Washington is focusing on debt rather than jobs. It was also a great opportunity for people interested in investigative business journalism to ask them questions – they’ve won every major investigative reporting award, except for the one named after them.

The Inquirer was the paper that published the original America: What Went Wrong series in 1991. We’re thrilled to be partnering with the ...

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June newsletter

Posted: June 18, 2011 | Tags: Investigative Reporting Workshop, What Went Wrong

What Went Wrong's Kat Aaron shares how she has been using social media to find and connect with interview subjects, and intern Vaughn Hillyard explains how more video is being integrated in to the website.

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Are cuts and benefits helping the economy?

Posted: June 8, 2011 | Tags: unemployment

Kat Aaron examines the changes in programs that struggling people depend on. See our 50-state chart as well as the full article on The American Prospect website.

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Recent Posts

The back-story behind Workshop's first data project on banks

In BankTracker, our long-running series that debuted in March 2009, we analyzed publicly available data to report on the financial health of the nation’s banks and credit unions. Though the project met with resistance from the banking association at the time, the updates continue to be welcomed by readers.

Washington journalists on Trump’s war on the press

Trump’s war on the press is a political strategy and it’s working, Margaret Sullivan, the media columnist for The Washington Post, said at the 2017 Missouri-Hurley Symposium at the National Press Club last week.

A journalist who sought to democratize data

In a period when many academics, journalists, civil-society groups and citizens fear that federal data may be altered to suit political agendas, the tools and techniques data journalists use will help keep it honest. And David Donald was one data journalism's standard bearers, taking steps to lowering barriers to entry in the field, including co-hosting workshops for social workers, real-estate brokers, designers, business managers, pediatricians, even zoologists. 


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