Archives for December, 2011

Aaron awarded fellowship

Posted: Dec. 20, 2011 | Tags: Workshop news

Our Kat Aaron, project editor of What Went Wrong, has been named as an Alicia Patterson Fellow for 2012. The prestigious Patterson fellowship will allow Aaron to continue her reporting into the functioning of the nation's civil courts system. She wrote two stories on the civil courts earlier this year, exploring the history of controversy around the Legal Services Corporation and the impact of budget cuts on civil justice. The program, named for Alicia Patterson, the longtime editor and publisher of Newsday, was was established in 1965 to support working journalists pursuing in-depth reporting. It is America’s oldest ...

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Producer nominated for Flying Cheaper

Posted: Dec. 16, 2011 | Tags: airline maintenance

Rick_Young.jpg

Photo by Jeff Watts, AU

Young gets second nomination.

Rick Young, PBS FRONTLINE and Investigative Reporting Workshop producer, was nominated for a 2012 Writers Guild award today for Flying Cheaper, which aired earlier this year.

The program was a follow-up to last year’s Flying Cheap, a one-hour co-production of the Workshop and FRONTLINE, for which Young received a 2011 Writers’ Guild award in the documentary category.

In Flying Cheaper, we examined the growth of contract maintenance in the airline industry, as carriers outsource more of their work.

The Writers Guild of America, West and the Writers Guild of America ...

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The Workshop needs your help

Posted: Dec. 15, 2011 | Tags: Workshop news

For nearly three years, the Investigative Reporting Workshop has been bringing you outstanding coverage of key issues. We’ve reported on the banking crisis, stimulus funding for green energy projects, lobbying by the nuclear power industry, among other stories. Our partnership with FRONTLINE has produced acclaimed documentaries on airline safety and immigration detention. Our ongoing What Went Wrong project is putting a spotlight on the systemic  issues facing the American economy, providing a context for the current debates in Washington and the motivation of the people participating in the nationwide Occupy movement. Executive Editor Charles Lewis has written extensively about ...

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Coal company pays record settlement

Posted: Dec. 7, 2011 | Tags: mine, west virginia

The owner of the Upper Big Branch coal mine in West Virginia, where 29 men died in an explosion last year, has agreed to pay $209 million in civil and criminal penalties. This is the largest settlement in a criminal investigation of a mine disaster in U.S. history, which you can read about in the Charleston, W.Va., Gazette. Last year, we reported on the poor safety record of Massey Energy, which Alpha Natural Resources bought out in June.  

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Recent Posts

Editors: 'We are not at war with Trump'

Top editors of two of the country’s leading news organizations said that their reporters were at the forefront of covering the Trump administration, but they were not competing with each other to topple the presidency.

Dean Baquet and Marty Baron, executive editors of The New York Times and The Washington Post, respectively, said that a journalist’s mission of pursuing truth and fairness hasn’t changed in the Trump era.

Behind the Post's opioids investigation

Graduate student and Workshop intern Reis Thebault was a contributing reporter to a recent Washington Post investigation into congressional action that many in the Drug Enforcement Agency saw as hampering their efforts to stem the opioid crisis.

King hoped to enlighten Kennedy on civil rights

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. tried to influence John F. Kennedy in his run for president because he saw Kennedy as far removed from the realities of blacks in America, according to a new book on the relationship between the two powerful men. 


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