The Investigative Reporting Workshop’s Blogs

Exemption 10

No, government is not too open

March 13-19 was Sunshine Week — a nationwide celebration of access to public information. Across the country, the week was marked by panel discussions, workshops and other events about using and understanding the latest developments in freedom-of-information resources. One of those was an event at the University of Missouri in which Charles Lewis, the Workshop's executive editor, argued that government has not become too transparent.

iFOIA's new site features tracking

Since 1996 the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press has offered a free letter-generating service to provide users with the correct language and structure for FOIA requests. Over the past year the committee looked for ways to expand this tool to better serve reporters. In recognition of the fact that a single investigation can require hundreds of FOIA requests, they sought to make it easier for journalists to track and organize records requests.

“Reporters are always trying to remember where they’ve submitted requests, how much time has passed since they made the request and who they need to follow up with,” said Emily Grannis of the new ifOIA website.

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Shop Notes

Whatever you do, keep moving forward

As Michelle Obama prepares to visit Africa to promote girls' education, two African women contemplate their future as investigative journalists and as educators who can improve college courses and create internships. 

Seeking to escape metrics' tyranny, an editor asks, 'Why?'

In our brave new big data world, web metrics, the statistics that measure page views, unique visitors, bounce rates, engagement time, tweets, Facebook “Likes,” and a host of other things, have become proxies for an organization’s effectiveness.

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Incubating new economic models for journalism.

Latest from iLab

Collaboration: the key

Collaboration was key for the teams of international journalists who produced The Panama Papers, a report that showcases how reporters can hold people and institutions accountable across borders. 

The Buying of the President

Every four years, the American people endure by far the longest and most expensive election of any nation in the world — until the next one. Who profits the most?

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Whatever you do, keep moving forward

As Michelle Obama prepares to visit Africa to promote girls' education, two African women contemplate their future as investigative journalists and as educators who can improve college courses and create internships. 

Seeking to escape metrics' tyranny, an editor asks, 'Why?'

In our brave new big data world, web metrics, the statistics that measure page views, unique visitors, bounce rates, engagement time, tweets, Facebook “Likes,” and a host of other things, have become proxies for an organization’s effectiveness.

SPJ honors Lewis with Distinguished Service Award

The Society of Professional Journalists (Washington, D.C., chapter) honored Executive Editor Charles Lewis with the 2016 Distinguished Public Service Award, presented Tuesday night at the National Press Club in Washington.

Survey shows extent of reporting worldwide

A new package of stories, maps and graphics showcases our survey of reporting organizations overseas. In addition, Executive Editor Charles Lewis reflects on his years of traveling and advising startups in other countries.

Madden wins Schorr prize

Patrick Madden of NPR member station WAMU 88.5 is the winner of the annual Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize, named for the respected NPR senior news analyst and veteran Washington journalist who died in 2010. His winning entry was "Assault on Justice," a collaboration with the Workshop and Reveal News.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.